Reasons for Moving to Virtualization

If you’re trying to decide if virtualization is right for your organization, whether from an economic or technological standpoint, consider these reasons for taking the virtualization plunge:

  • It saves money: Virtualization reduces the number of servers you have to run, which means savings on hardware costs and also on the total amount of energy needed to run hardware and provide cooling.
  • It’s good for the environment: Virtualization is a green technology through and through. Energy savings brought on by widespread adoption of virtualization technologies would negate the need to build so many power plants and would thus conserve our earth’s energy resources.
  • It reduces system administration work: With virtualization in place, system administrators would not have to support so many machines and could then move from firefighting to more strategic administration tasks.
  • It gets better use from hardware: Virtualization enables higher utilization rates of hardware because each server supports enough virtual machines to increase its utilization from the typical 15% to as much as 80%.
  • It makes software installation easier: With software vendors tending more and more towards delivering their products preinstalled in virtual machines (also known as virtual appliances), much of the traditional installation and configuration work associated with software will disappear.
Thin clients perform all the functions as regular desktops.

Thin clients perform all the functions as regular desktops.

Virtualization Mini-Glossary

To help you get a better understanding and expand your knowledge of virtualization, get to know these useful terms and how they apply to virtualization and its process:

  • Bare metal: Virtualized servers in which the virtualization software is installed directly on the machine rather than on an operating system. Because it installs on the machine, it is said to reside on “bare metal.”
  • Client virtualization: Using virtualization to enable a client device (like a laptop) to support isolated operating environments. Client virtualization is often used to move workloads into isolated environments to reduce system administration requirements.
  • P2V: Shorthand for “physical to virtual.” P2V stands for the process of migrating systems from the physical hardware they originally ran on to virtual operating environments running in a virtualized environment.
  • Server virtualization: Running virtualization software on server machines in order to host multiple operating system environments on a single piece of hardware.
  • Storage virtualization: Using shared storage located on individual servers so that multiple servers can share a single storage device. Storage virtualization is often implemented after initial server virtualization efforts in order to centralize resources and reduce storage administration work.